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Welsh Arctic adventurer headlines International Women’s Day at the National Assembly

5 March 2012

Polar explorer, Tori James, will give the keynote lecture at an event to celebrate International Women’s Day, hosted by the National Assembly’s Presiding Officer on Thursday (8 March).

The event, to be held at the historic Pierhead in Cardiff Bay, will focus on women in public service as its main theme.

Delegates will attend a breakfast seminar and panel discussion in the morning before the lunchtime lecture.

Women Assembly Members 2012

The panel will be chaired by Managing Director of Tinopolis, Angharad Mair, and includes Kate Bennett and Ann Beynon from the Equality and Human Rights Commission; Laura McAllister, Chair of Sport Wales; and Claire Clancy, Chief Executive and Clerk of the National Assembly for Wales.

The lunchtime lecture will be delivered by Tori James who, in 2007, became the youngest British woman and first Welsh woman to climb Mount Everest and also led an all-female team in the Polar Challenge, a 360 mile race to the magnetic North Pole, in 2005.

“It is wonderful to have such an inspirational person as Tori to speak at our event to mark International Women’s Day,” said Rosemary Butler AM, Presiding Officer of the National Assembly for Wales.

“We are delighted to be working with the Equality and Human Rights Commission, the British Council, the Institute of Welsh Affairs and homeless young people’s charity Llamau. who have all helped to make this event possible.

“I am really looking forward to hearing about Tori’s experiences and the advice and opinions of all of our speakers who have succeeded in their chosen careers and can, I’m sure, provide inspiration for others.”

Kate Bennett, National Director for Wales, Equality and Human Rights Commission, said:

“International Women’s Day offers us a chance to celebrate the progress that has been made towards gender equality. I am delighted to be marking this occasion alongside the Presiding Officer.

“The day also brings into sharp focus the work that still needs doing if we are to create a Wales that is truly fair for women.

“Our evidence shows that women remain severely under-represented in senior positions in Wales and too many women are confined to the lowest-paid jobs.

“The goals of fair pay and better employment opportunities set at the first International Women’s Day in 1911 remain as important as ever.”

As well as seminars and the lunchtime lecture delegates will also watch videos of Assembly Members giving their thoughts on what International Women’s Day means to them.

The event is part of a series which highlights the Presiding Officer’s determination to promote equality in Wales.

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